Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy delivers continuous insulin support to diabetics. The insulin pump is a small device which is about the size of a small cell phone. The device is worn outside the body and delivers insulin through a small tube.

The end of the thin tube, called the cannula, is inserted under the skin. The cannula must be reinserted under the skin twelve times a month. A reinsertion of the cannula feels like a needle prick. The reinsertions of the cannula is generally preferred to daily injections.

The insulin pump delivers the amount of insulin that the diabetic patient deems necessary. A base rate of insulin is delivered to the body. This mimics the normal production of insulin by the pancreas in those without diabetes. When food is eaten, the insulin pump user programs the pump to provide the necessary amount of insulin.

The use of insulin pump therapy eliminates the need for daily multiple injections of insulin. One of the benefits is the freedom that this therapy offers to the diabetic. Administering insulin by multiple daily injections often requires that the diabetic follow a strict schedule. With the insulin pump, the need for a schedule is minimized if not entirely eliminated. People using insulin pump therapy are reported to have more dietary freedom and less risk of complications from diabetes such as eye, kidney, and nerve disease.

The insulin pump user needs only to program the doses of insulin that are necessary to control the blood glucose level. The base rate of insulin can be adjusted in preparation of exercise or in times of illness or infection. The delivery of a base rate of insulin helps the diabetic achieve a steady blood glucose level. The cost of insulin pump therapy is higher than using insulin injections. For diabetics who have difficulty regulating their blood glucose levels, the pump may be the healthier insulin delivery method.

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Diabetes Treatment

Though there is no cure for diabetes, with proper treatment, the diabetic patient can have a healthy life and avoid complications. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin production by the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is caused by a tolerance to insulin or a decrease in the body’s production of insulin.

Diabetes treatment for both types of diabetes involves monitoring blood sugar level and doing what is necessary to compensate for the loss or impairment of the body’s insulin. Type 2 diabetes can often be managed by diet and exercise. If their blood sugar levels continue to rise to unsafe levels, people with type 2 diabetes may need to use insulin. People with type 1 diabetes need to use insulin since their bodies don’t produce insulin.

Following a diabetic diet and exercising are important components of the treatment of both types of diabetes. The diabetic diet is devised with the help of a nutritionist or dietician. Small, more frequent meals can limit spikes in blood glucose levels. However, this can make monitoring blood sugar levels more challenging.  

Diabetes treatment is a team effort. The diabetic patient, physician, and dietician work together to create a treatment plan that the diabetic can follow. The treatment plan may change if the original one is not effectively managing the illness. The diabetic patient needs to feel confident that they can follow the treatment plan. The dietician could devise the best diabetic diet ever conceived, but if the patient can’t follow it, it will be a failure.

Insulin may be an element of the patient’s diabetes treatment. Individual injections and insulin pump therapy are two options for the administration of insulin. With individual injections, diabetic patients check their blood sugar levels and inject the appropriate amount of insulin. When using insulin pump therapy, the device provides a continuous base rate of insulin to the body. After meals, the patient checks their blood sugar level and programs the insulin pump to deliver the necessary dose.  

Diabetic Desserts

Having diabetes does not mean that desserts are off limits. Diabetic desserts can satisfy cravings for sweets without jeopardizing the diabetic patient’s health. Besides fruit, which is okay on moderation according to the patient’s diabetic diet, there are desserts that can be bought or made at home that are dietetic.

When a food label says dietetic, it means that the food fits into a special diet. The special diet that dietetic foods are created and marketed towards is usually the diabetic diet. The diabetic patient should read labels carefully, especially when selecting dessert items. Technically, a food could be labeled as “dietetic” if it fits in any special diet, including a low-sodium diet. Therefore, people with diabetes should read the labels to ensure that the food is appropriate for people with diabetes.

Recipes for diabetic desserts can be found on the Internet. Dessert recipes designed for diabetic patients often use sugar-free ingredients. It is often possible for a diabetic patient to make desserts they loved before their diagnosis by substituting ingredients high in sugar content for sugar-free versions.

Portion control is an important element of following the diabetic diet. The dietician can advise the diabetic patients on the proper portion sizes for each food group. It is just as important to follow portion control with desserts as it is with the other foods.

The dietician can make recommendations for desserts that are both healthy and satisfying. Dieticians will often alter recipes for their clients. A diabetic patient can take a recipe to the dietician and work with them to make the appropriate substitutions. Occasionally, a recipe is just too unhealthy to change to a diabetic dessert without ruining the taste. In that case, the dietician can sometimes recommend a dessert that would offer the same or similar taste without being unhealthy.