Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestastional diabetes can have negative consequences for both mother and baby. Gestational diabetes causes a pregnant woman to have high blood sugar levels even though she was not diabetic before pregnancy. The high blood sugar levels associated with gestational diabetes are often controlled with a gestational diabetes diet. If the blood sugar levels continue to be high, insulin injections may be necessary.

A gestational diabetes diet is similar to a diabetes diet. The difference is that the gestational diabetic diet must take into account the caloric demand of pregnancy. Therefore, the gestational diabetes diet may include more calories than the diabetic diet may include if the woman was not pregnant.

The obstetrician may recommend that the gestational diabetic patient meet with a nutritionist to devise a gestational diabetes diet. Like the diabetic diet, a nutritionist can structure a diet that specifies the servings of the food groups for each meal and snack. The nutritionist can educate the gestational diabetic patient on portion sizes and healthy food choices.

Fruit juice, large servings of starches, and sugar can cause blood sugar levels to spike. The gestational diabetic patients check and record their blood sugar levels after meals. If the blood sugar levels are too high, the nutritionist can make recommendations on foods to eat and those to avoid. If the first blood sugar level, or fasting blood sugar level, is too low, the nutritionist may recommend a snack at night that would help prevent the blood sugar level from becoming too low.   

If the pregnant woman’s blood glucose levels remain high, the baby’s blood glucose levels are higher than they should be. The high blood glucose levels of the baby causes the baby’s pancreas to produce extra insulin. The insulin turns the glucose into energy. The energy that is not needed by the baby is turned into fat. Babies whose mothers’ had gestational diabetes tend to be large due to this extra fat.

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Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is eye damage, specifically to the retina, that is caused by diabetes. It can lead to blindness if not treated promptly. Most people with diabetes who have complications of diabetes that affect the eye only experience minor eye conditions and mild visual impairment.

The most common form of diabetic retinopathy is called nonproliferative retinopathy. Nonproliferative retinopathy causes the capillaries, tiny blood vessels, of the eyes to weaken. The capillaries balloon and become blocked.

The body naturally tries to replace these compromised capillaries, but the new capillaries are weak. These new, weak capillaries have a tendency to fail and leak blood into the vitreous of the eye. When blood invades the vitreous part of the eye, vision is blocked. This is called a vitreous hemorrhage.

The prevention of blindness from diabetic retinopathy is best if treatment is sought immediately after the onset of symptoms. Laser treatments target the failing capillaries to prevent them from causing further damage. Laser treatments do not reverse any vision loss or visual impairment. Potential side effects of some laser treatments include temporary blurry vision and loss of peripheral vision.

 In severe cases, a vitrectomy may be necessary. A vitrectomy is a surgical procedure during which blood is removed from the vitreous. Any scar tissue that formed as a resut of the diabetic retinopathy is also removed during the surgery. If the retina has become attached, an attempt to reattach the retina is usually made during the vitrectomy. The reattachment of the retina is only successful in about half the cases.

In addition to diabetic retinopathy, diabetic patients are at greater risk for developing glaucoma and cataracts. The best way to avoid blindness and other serious complications of diabetes is to manage blood glucose levels and seek prompt medical attention as soon as the symptoms of a complication arise.

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes complications can be serious. Diabetes can cause nerve damage. Nerve damage caused by diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. People with diabetic neuropathy may experience numbness, pain, or tingling in the extremities or have no symptoms. Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes, especially for diabetic patients who have had diabetes for over twenty-five years.

People with diabetes have an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. Fatty deposits can accumulate inside blood vessels due to high levels of glucose in the blood. These fatty deposits constrict blood flow which can lead to heart disease. If a blood vessel in the brain or neck becomes clogged, it can cause a stroke.

Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye disease associated with diabetes. Diabetes retinopathy is a condition that can cause the small blood vessels of the eyes to leak blood. This condition can cause blurriness, blank spots, dark spots, flashing lights, and pain or pressure in the eyes.

If diabetic retinopathy is left untreated, it can lead to blindness. If diabetic patients experience any vision problems, they should notify their physicians. Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with lasers to stop blood vessels from continuing to leak into the vitreous of the eye.

Diabetes can cause kidney failure. People who have had diabetes for at least fifteen years are at greater risk for kidney failure. Diabetes impairs the kidneys’ ability to filter waste from the blood.  

There are some lesser-known complications of diabetes. Erectile dysfunction affects thirty-five to fifty percent of men with diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes can increase a diabetic patient’s risk of tooth and gum disease.

Gastroparesis is caused my nerve damage affecting the nerves of the stomach. This complication of diabetes causes gastrointestinal problems such as heartburn, reflux, and nausea. Gastroparesis extends the amount of time it takes for food to digest. Partially undigested food can sit in the stomach for significant periods of time which can cause a blockage of the digestive tract.  

Diabetes Treatment

Though there is no cure for diabetes, with proper treatment, the diabetic patient can have a healthy life and avoid complications. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin production by the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is caused by a tolerance to insulin or a decrease in the body’s production of insulin.

Diabetes treatment for both types of diabetes involves monitoring blood sugar level and doing what is necessary to compensate for the loss or impairment of the body’s insulin. Type 2 diabetes can often be managed by diet and exercise. If their blood sugar levels continue to rise to unsafe levels, people with type 2 diabetes may need to use insulin. People with type 1 diabetes need to use insulin since their bodies don’t produce insulin.

Following a diabetic diet and exercising are important components of the treatment of both types of diabetes. The diabetic diet is devised with the help of a nutritionist or dietician. Small, more frequent meals can limit spikes in blood glucose levels. However, this can make monitoring blood sugar levels more challenging.  

Diabetes treatment is a team effort. The diabetic patient, physician, and dietician work together to create a treatment plan that the diabetic can follow. The treatment plan may change if the original one is not effectively managing the illness. The diabetic patient needs to feel confident that they can follow the treatment plan. The dietician could devise the best diabetic diet ever conceived, but if the patient can’t follow it, it will be a failure.

Insulin may be an element of the patient’s diabetes treatment. Individual injections and insulin pump therapy are two options for the administration of insulin. With individual injections, diabetic patients check their blood sugar levels and inject the appropriate amount of insulin. When using insulin pump therapy, the device provides a continuous base rate of insulin to the body. After meals, the patient checks their blood sugar level and programs the insulin pump to deliver the necessary dose.  

Cheap Diabetic Shoes

Diabetic foot care is crucial in diabetes care. Diabetic foot care involves taking measures to prevent injury to the feet as well as seeking prompt medical treatment for any sores that may occur. Diabetic socks and diabetic shoes are designed to help prevent injuries to the diabetic foot.

People with diabetes often have nerve damage associated with diabetes. This nerve damage, or neuropathy, reduces the diabetic patient’s ability to feel sensations from the feet. Therefore, if the diabetic patient’s shoes rub or cause pressure on the feet, it may go unnoticed.

If sores or other injuries develop, the diabetic patient may remain unaware of the problem. Due to circulation problems that are complications of diabetes, sores take longer to heal. Even a small sore can become problematic. Sores can become infected before the diabetic patient knows of the existence of the sore. A small sore that becomes infected can ulcerate and lead to the amputation of the foot.

Prevention of sores is a priority in diabetic care. Diabetic shoes are designed to help prevent sores by reducing friction and pressure on the foot. Cheap diabetic shoes can be found on the Internet. Diabetic shoes are a form of orthopedic shoes. Online retailers that specialize in orthopedics may offer cheap diabetic shoes.

Cheap diabetic shoes should retain qualities that make them a part of diabetic foot care. Certain characteristics make cheap diabetic shoes a component of diabetic care. Diabetic shoes are wider that regular shoes in order to avoid pinching the toes and causing friction. They are designed to accommodate the orthopedic insoles that diabetic patients may have from podiatrists.

Cheap diabetic shoes should have good air circulation to help prevent the buildup of moisture in the shoes. There should be no seams inside the shoes that could rub against the sensitive skin of the diabetic foot. If there are seams, they should be covered.

If the cheap diabetic shoe is too big, it could cause friction by sliding on the foot. If the shoe is too small, it causes pressure and friction on the foot. The cheap diabetic shoes must fit properly.

Diabetes Symptoms

Symptoms of diabetes can act as warning signs for the disease. These common symptoms of diabetes can let doctors know that the patient needs to be tested for diabetes. Excessive thirst and frequent urination are common initial symptoms caused by a diabetic condition.

These symptoms are both causally linked and due to high glucose levels. When the blood glucose level is too high, glucose tends to accumulate in the kidneys. The kidneys attempt to dilute the glucose by drawing water from the blood. Therefore, the person becomes thirsty due to the body’s need for more water. Frequent urination then occurs from the excessive amounts of water consumed and the kidneys’ action of drawing increased amounts of water from the blood.

Extreme hunger and unusual weight loss are diabetes symptoms. The weight loss can seem perplexing to the patient since the hunger may cause them to be eating more than usual. The patient may realize something is wrong since these symptoms would not occur together normally. Weight loss is more noticeable with type 1 diabetes.

Blurry vision can be a symptom of diabetes. Many people do not associate blurry vision with a sign of the onset of diabetes. Another symptom is tingling or numbness in the hands or feet. This is due to the onset of diabetic nerve damage, known as diabetic neuropathy.

Irritability and increased fatigue are more difficult symptoms to associate with diabetes since they can occur as symptoms of numerous illnesses. If people experience irritability and increased fatigue along with some of the other symptoms of diabetes, it can affirm the need for a blood glucose test to rule out or diagnose diabetes.

If a person experiences these signs of diabetes, they should consult their physicians. The doctor is likely to issue or prescribe a blood sugar test. The test results may indicate that the patient has normal blood sugar levels, pre-diabetes, or diabetes.    

Diabetes Care

Diabetes care is crucial if serious complications from diabetes are to be avoided. Diabetes care consists of managing the level of glucose in the blood to prevent it from rising to unsafe levels. The management of diabetes involves monitoring the blood glucose levels, correcting the levels with insulin if necessary, and following a healthy lifestyle that encourages the maintenance of healthy glucose levels.

Monitoring the blood glucose levels is generally done periodically throughout each day. A typical regiment includes checking the blood glucose level upon waking and after each meal. The physician may prescribe a different schedule. It is important for the diabetic to work cooperatively with the doctor in order to control the diabetes.

The administration of insulin is sometimes, but not always, a necessary component of diabetes care, Insulin can be used with individual injections of insulin or with insulin pump therapy. With individual injections, the diabetic checks their blood glucose level with a monitor and takes the appropriate amount of insulin with an injection. The insulin pump provides a steady amount of insulin to the body with additional, programmed doses after meals and as needed.

Healthy living can help maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Exercise delivers more glucose to the cells from the blood. This can lower otherwise high glucose levels in the blood. Excessive stress should be avoided as it can cause problems with blood glucose levels. Exercise can help alleviate the negative impact of stress on the body.

Small, more frequent meals can aid in keeping the blood glucose levels steady, but eating like this can make it more difficult to monitor the blood glucose levels. A dietary plan should be developed with the assistance of a dietician who is experienced in working with diabetics. In an ideal situation, the diabetic patient, the physician, and the dietician work together as a team to devise a plan for diabetes care.