Diabetes Diet

The diabetic patient should consider meeting with a dietician or nutritionist to develop a diabetes diet with which the patient feels comfortable. The dietician can not only device a dietary plan that can help control the diabetes, but can also include provisions that will help the diabetic lose weight if that is recommended or desired.

The typical diabetes diet includes a specified number of portions from each food group. The diabetic patient frequently has the freedom to select foods from the food groups as long as they follow the portion guidelines.

 For example, if the diabetes diet specifies that breakfast needs to consist of one protein, one bread, one fat, and one fruit, the diabetic patient has the freedom to chose which foods they will eat to fill those specifications. Among the various options, they may chose to have an egg, toast, butter, and juice or toast, peanut butter, and an apple.

A typical diabetes diet includes two servings of milk, six to eight starches, three to four vegetables, two to three fruits, up to four fats, and four to six ounces of meat or other protein. These portions are often outlined into the meals and two snacks. The dietician can provide a wealth of information on how best to structure and fill the dietary requirements.

Following a diabetes diet becomes easier with time. The diabetic patient is likely to learn what combinations of food are most pleasing and most healthy for the maintenance of the diabetes. Consuming large portions of starch without protein will often cause a spike in blood sugar levels as a non-diabetic dessert would. Therefore, just avoiding sugary sweets is not enough. Fruit juice also tends to raise blood sugar levels more than a piece of fruit would.

The diabetic patient should feel comfortable asking questions and being directly involved with the development of the diabetic diet. If the diabetic patient has a favorite food, it can often be worked into the diet with the help of the dietician. Just because the patient has to follow dietary specifications to control the diabetes does not mean that the patient must feel deprived or hungry. The formation and following of a diabetes diet can be a rewarding experience.

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Diabetic Desserts

Having diabetes does not mean that desserts are off limits. Diabetic desserts can satisfy cravings for sweets without jeopardizing the diabetic patient’s health. Besides fruit, which is okay on moderation according to the patient’s diabetic diet, there are desserts that can be bought or made at home that are dietetic.

When a food label says dietetic, it means that the food fits into a special diet. The special diet that dietetic foods are created and marketed towards is usually the diabetic diet. The diabetic patient should read labels carefully, especially when selecting dessert items. Technically, a food could be labeled as “dietetic” if it fits in any special diet, including a low-sodium diet. Therefore, people with diabetes should read the labels to ensure that the food is appropriate for people with diabetes.

Recipes for diabetic desserts can be found on the Internet. Dessert recipes designed for diabetic patients often use sugar-free ingredients. It is often possible for a diabetic patient to make desserts they loved before their diagnosis by substituting ingredients high in sugar content for sugar-free versions.

Portion control is an important element of following the diabetic diet. The dietician can advise the diabetic patients on the proper portion sizes for each food group. It is just as important to follow portion control with desserts as it is with the other foods.

The dietician can make recommendations for desserts that are both healthy and satisfying. Dieticians will often alter recipes for their clients. A diabetic patient can take a recipe to the dietician and work with them to make the appropriate substitutions. Occasionally, a recipe is just too unhealthy to change to a diabetic dessert without ruining the taste. In that case, the dietician can sometimes recommend a dessert that would offer the same or similar taste without being unhealthy.

Do You Need To Follow A Diabetic Diet?

If you are suffering from diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin on its own. This can leads to high blood glucose, or sugar, levels in your blood. All this can leads to complications if it is not treated and untreated diabetes can eventually leads to death due to the diabetes complications.  

There are several points in the treatment of diabetes and they all play a very important role.

  • Regular exercising helps to strengthen your heart and may also lower your blood sugar level
  • Staying in good shape maintaining a good BMI, meaning an ideal body weight for your height
  • Taking diabetic medication regularly if required by doctors,
  • Following strictly to a diabetic diet, which is what this blog will specifically emphasize on.

Eating healthily helps to reduce your blood sugar. It is a important part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent diabetic complications, like diabetic retinopathy, kidney failure or diabetic neuropathy etc.

So what is a diabetic diet?

A diabetic diet is effective a diet that has got high in dietary fibre, especially soluble fibre, but low in saturated fat, lesser of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index.

Diabetes experts suggest diabetic meal plans that are flexible and able to take your lifestyle and other health needs into consideration.

You can also read more at
http://www.endocrineweb.com/diabetes/treatment.html 
http://www.diabetic-diets.net/

Type 1 Diabetes And Insulin Production

Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas fails to produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is necessary for the body to convert food, especially sugar (glucose) and starches, into energy. Type 1 diabetes is diabetes that has an early onset which occurs during childhood through young adulthood. It was formally called juvenile diabetes.

The development of type 1 diabetes can be genetic or due to infection from certain viruses. Treatment for type 1 diabetes involves blood glucose monitoring and the administration of insulin since the pancreas is not producing it.

The physician advises on the treatment and administration of insulin based on the levels of glucose in the blood. Blood glucose levels are checked with a glucose meter. The monitoring of glucose levels is often done several times a day. Careful monitoring of the amount of sugar in the blood is a crucial component in diabetes treatment.

Healthy diet and exercise help decrease blood glucose levels. The physician may suggest a consultation with a dietician to construct a diabetic diet for the patient to follow. Exercise helps glucose be absorbed by cells. A decrease in the insulin dose may be necessary while exercising.

Illnesses, including the common cold, can increase the amount of glucose in the blood. Therefore, when people with diabetes are sick, they may need to increase their insulin dosages to compensate. Stress can also impact the blood glucose level and need for insulin.

Type 1 diabetes increases the individual’s risk for certain diseases. Heart disease, blindness, neuropathy, and kidney damage are potential complications of diabetes. Neuropathy is nerve damage.

Skin care and diabetic foot care are important for those with diabetes. If skin damage or injuries to the foot are treated early, associated complications can often be avoided. This is also true with eye problems. Early detection and treatment is paramount to prevent serious complications associated with diabetes.