Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is eye damage, specifically to the retina, that is caused by diabetes. It can lead to blindness if not treated promptly. Most people with diabetes who have complications of diabetes that affect the eye only experience minor eye conditions and mild visual impairment.

The most common form of diabetic retinopathy is called nonproliferative retinopathy. Nonproliferative retinopathy causes the capillaries, tiny blood vessels, of the eyes to weaken. The capillaries balloon and become blocked.

The body naturally tries to replace these compromised capillaries, but the new capillaries are weak. These new, weak capillaries have a tendency to fail and leak blood into the vitreous of the eye. When blood invades the vitreous part of the eye, vision is blocked. This is called a vitreous hemorrhage.

The prevention of blindness from diabetic retinopathy is best if treatment is sought immediately after the onset of symptoms. Laser treatments target the failing capillaries to prevent them from causing further damage. Laser treatments do not reverse any vision loss or visual impairment. Potential side effects of some laser treatments include temporary blurry vision and loss of peripheral vision.

 In severe cases, a vitrectomy may be necessary. A vitrectomy is a surgical procedure during which blood is removed from the vitreous. Any scar tissue that formed as a resut of the diabetic retinopathy is also removed during the surgery. If the retina has become attached, an attempt to reattach the retina is usually made during the vitrectomy. The reattachment of the retina is only successful in about half the cases.

In addition to diabetic retinopathy, diabetic patients are at greater risk for developing glaucoma and cataracts. The best way to avoid blindness and other serious complications of diabetes is to manage blood glucose levels and seek prompt medical attention as soon as the symptoms of a complication arise.

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Are You Suffering From Diabetes?

According to the American Diabetes Association, in the United States alone there are 23.6 million people, or shockingly, 8% of the population, who have diabetes. That is a very shocking figure. And most of them are diagnosed with diabetes, in the last ten years.

Could it be due to the everchanging diets of the people? Could it be genetic and hereditary? I think all of the above.

Over the years, as people got more affluent, their diets change too. Everyone starts to be more occupied with work, studies and even leisure and they started to save time on their sleeping time and meals, hence lack of exercise and fast foods has become the ideal choice, and the rest is history. No offence to fast foods but we all know that too much fast food will gradually create more health issues. No details to be mentioned.

There is a Chinese saying, “Illness starts from what goes into one’s mouth while trouble starts from what comes out of it.” So it can be true that diabetes can be caused by the horrific diets of many type II diabetes patients.

It could also be passed genetically, there is also research evidence to prove that it may run in families too. So if either of your parents has got type II diabetes, you got to really watch your diet, sugar blood level and keep fit by exercising to help reduce the chance of getting diabetes.

Further read – http://www.tasteofhome.com/Is-diabetes-hereditary–

Do You Need To Follow A Diabetic Diet?

If you are suffering from diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin on its own. This can leads to high blood glucose, or sugar, levels in your blood. All this can leads to complications if it is not treated and untreated diabetes can eventually leads to death due to the diabetes complications.  

There are several points in the treatment of diabetes and they all play a very important role.

  • Regular exercising helps to strengthen your heart and may also lower your blood sugar level
  • Staying in good shape maintaining a good BMI, meaning an ideal body weight for your height
  • Taking diabetic medication regularly if required by doctors,
  • Following strictly to a diabetic diet, which is what this blog will specifically emphasize on.

Eating healthily helps to reduce your blood sugar. It is a important part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent diabetic complications, like diabetic retinopathy, kidney failure or diabetic neuropathy etc.

So what is a diabetic diet?

A diabetic diet is effective a diet that has got high in dietary fibre, especially soluble fibre, but low in saturated fat, lesser of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index.

Diabetes experts suggest diabetic meal plans that are flexible and able to take your lifestyle and other health needs into consideration.

You can also read more at
http://www.endocrineweb.com/diabetes/treatment.html 
http://www.diabetic-diets.net/