Diabetes Treatment

Though there is no cure for diabetes, with proper treatment, the diabetic patient can have a healthy life and avoid complications. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin production by the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is caused by a tolerance to insulin or a decrease in the body’s production of insulin.

Diabetes treatment for both types of diabetes involves monitoring blood sugar level and doing what is necessary to compensate for the loss or impairment of the body’s insulin. Type 2 diabetes can often be managed by diet and exercise. If their blood sugar levels continue to rise to unsafe levels, people with type 2 diabetes may need to use insulin. People with type 1 diabetes need to use insulin since their bodies don’t produce insulin.

Following a diabetic diet and exercising are important components of the treatment of both types of diabetes. The diabetic diet is devised with the help of a nutritionist or dietician. Small, more frequent meals can limit spikes in blood glucose levels. However, this can make monitoring blood sugar levels more challenging.  

Diabetes treatment is a team effort. The diabetic patient, physician, and dietician work together to create a treatment plan that the diabetic can follow. The treatment plan may change if the original one is not effectively managing the illness. The diabetic patient needs to feel confident that they can follow the treatment plan. The dietician could devise the best diabetic diet ever conceived, but if the patient can’t follow it, it will be a failure.

Insulin may be an element of the patient’s diabetes treatment. Individual injections and insulin pump therapy are two options for the administration of insulin. With individual injections, diabetic patients check their blood sugar levels and inject the appropriate amount of insulin. When using insulin pump therapy, the device provides a continuous base rate of insulin to the body. After meals, the patient checks their blood sugar level and programs the insulin pump to deliver the necessary dose.  

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Type 2 Diabetes – Why And What

Type 2 diabetes is caused by a decrease in the effectiveness or production of insulin. Without insulin, the amount of glucose, or sugar, in the blood increases. The elevated blood sugar level causes diabetes. If left unmanaged, the high blood glucose level can lead to potentially dangerous complications of diabetes.

Excessive thirst and frequent urination are symptoms of diabetes that are often the first warning sign a person experiences. Excessive hunger, weight loss, and fatigue are common symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes can also cause blurred vision. Diabetes may make sores heal more slowly than usual. Frequent infections can also occur.

If someone experiences symptoms of diabetes, they should consult a doctor to be evaluated for the condition. The physician may use a blood sugar test to diagnose diabetes or rule it out if the blood sugar level is normal. A normal fasting blood sugar level is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). A level between 100 and 125 suggests prediabetes. Scoring above 125 on a fasting blood sugar test indicates diabetes. Instead of a fasting blood test, the doctor may use a random blood test. A score above 200 regardless of when the individual ate is indicative of diabetes.

Much like the tests used to diagnose diabetes, the diabetic patient must check the blood sugar level periodically each day. Usually a fasting reading is taken before the person eats breakfast. Then, the person takes another reading after each meal. It is important for the diabetic patient to follow the physician’s instructions for checking and recording blood sugars.

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), and a high level of ketones in the urine can be serious complications. If left untreated, they can cause seizures and loss of consciousness. Diabetes can cause damage to the eyes which can lead to blindness. Diabetes increases an individual’s risk for cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer’s. Damage to the kidneys, nerves, skin, and feet are possible complications of diabetes. If any symptoms of these conditions develop, early intervention is often the key to preventing a serious condition.