Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy delivers continuous insulin support to diabetics. The insulin pump is a small device which is about the size of a small cell phone. The device is worn outside the body and delivers insulin through a small tube.

The end of the thin tube, called the cannula, is inserted under the skin. The cannula must be reinserted under the skin twelve times a month. A reinsertion of the cannula feels like a needle prick. The reinsertions of the cannula is generally preferred to daily injections.

The insulin pump delivers the amount of insulin that the diabetic patient deems necessary. A base rate of insulin is delivered to the body. This mimics the normal production of insulin by the pancreas in those without diabetes. When food is eaten, the insulin pump user programs the pump to provide the necessary amount of insulin.

The use of insulin pump therapy eliminates the need for daily multiple injections of insulin. One of the benefits is the freedom that this therapy offers to the diabetic. Administering insulin by multiple daily injections often requires that the diabetic follow a strict schedule. With the insulin pump, the need for a schedule is minimized if not entirely eliminated. People using insulin pump therapy are reported to have more dietary freedom and less risk of complications from diabetes such as eye, kidney, and nerve disease.

The insulin pump user needs only to program the doses of insulin that are necessary to control the blood glucose level. The base rate of insulin can be adjusted in preparation of exercise or in times of illness or infection. The delivery of a base rate of insulin helps the diabetic achieve a steady blood glucose level. The cost of insulin pump therapy is higher than using insulin injections. For diabetics who have difficulty regulating their blood glucose levels, the pump may be the healthier insulin delivery method.

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Diabetics Knowhow – What Diabetic Patients Should Know

Diabetic patients are likely to learn little tricks that can make their lives easier. Through their own experiences and the experiences of other diabetic patients, someone with diabetes can learn things that will benefit them as they follow a diabetes treatment plan. Here are some tips of diabetics knowhow and what diabetic patients should know.

Some diabetic patients experience pain or difficulty obtaining blood samples for checking their blood level. Difficulty getting the proper amount of blood can be especially problematic first thing in the morning or for those who have circulation problems.

Though the newest blood glucose meters require very little blood, if the patient’s meter requires more blood than is easily obtained, there are tricks to help. Squeezing the fingers to coax blood onto the testing strip is not recommended. The diabetic patient may find it helpful to run their hands under warm water before attempting to get a blood sample.

If pain is bothersome, some diabetics find it less painful to prick the sides of the fingers and avoid the fingertips. There are more nerve endings in the fingertips, so pricking them causes more pain. Alternating which finger is pricked can also help.

Sometimes diabetic patients feel limited by their diabetic diets. Eating a large variety of foods can help avoid a sense of being stuck with a specific diet. Changing the foods that are eaten can still fill the specifications of the diabetic diet and foster a sense of freedom of choice. If the diabetic patient has favorite foods, they can consult the dietician for ways to include these foods in the diabetic diet. Some recipes can be altered to make a food healthier and more acceptable.

Eating protein with starches tends to stop the spikes in blood sugar that can be caused by the starch. For example, if eating spaghetti causes blood sugar level to rise too high, eating a smaller portion of spaghetti with light sausage or black beans added to the sauce can help keep the blood sugar level at a safe level. The dietician could provide numerous tips for enjoying food that satisfies the requirement for the diabetic diet.

Type 1 Diabetes And Insulin Production

Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas fails to produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is necessary for the body to convert food, especially sugar (glucose) and starches, into energy. Type 1 diabetes is diabetes that has an early onset which occurs during childhood through young adulthood. It was formally called juvenile diabetes.

The development of type 1 diabetes can be genetic or due to infection from certain viruses. Treatment for type 1 diabetes involves blood glucose monitoring and the administration of insulin since the pancreas is not producing it.

The physician advises on the treatment and administration of insulin based on the levels of glucose in the blood. Blood glucose levels are checked with a glucose meter. The monitoring of glucose levels is often done several times a day. Careful monitoring of the amount of sugar in the blood is a crucial component in diabetes treatment.

Healthy diet and exercise help decrease blood glucose levels. The physician may suggest a consultation with a dietician to construct a diabetic diet for the patient to follow. Exercise helps glucose be absorbed by cells. A decrease in the insulin dose may be necessary while exercising.

Illnesses, including the common cold, can increase the amount of glucose in the blood. Therefore, when people with diabetes are sick, they may need to increase their insulin dosages to compensate. Stress can also impact the blood glucose level and need for insulin.

Type 1 diabetes increases the individual’s risk for certain diseases. Heart disease, blindness, neuropathy, and kidney damage are potential complications of diabetes. Neuropathy is nerve damage.

Skin care and diabetic foot care are important for those with diabetes. If skin damage or injuries to the foot are treated early, associated complications can often be avoided. This is also true with eye problems. Early detection and treatment is paramount to prevent serious complications associated with diabetes.