Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestastional diabetes can have negative consequences for both mother and baby. Gestational diabetes causes a pregnant woman to have high blood sugar levels even though she was not diabetic before pregnancy. The high blood sugar levels associated with gestational diabetes are often controlled with a gestational diabetes diet. If the blood sugar levels continue to be high, insulin injections may be necessary.

A gestational diabetes diet is similar to a diabetes diet. The difference is that the gestational diabetic diet must take into account the caloric demand of pregnancy. Therefore, the gestational diabetes diet may include more calories than the diabetic diet may include if the woman was not pregnant.

The obstetrician may recommend that the gestational diabetic patient meet with a nutritionist to devise a gestational diabetes diet. Like the diabetic diet, a nutritionist can structure a diet that specifies the servings of the food groups for each meal and snack. The nutritionist can educate the gestational diabetic patient on portion sizes and healthy food choices.

Fruit juice, large servings of starches, and sugar can cause blood sugar levels to spike. The gestational diabetic patients check and record their blood sugar levels after meals. If the blood sugar levels are too high, the nutritionist can make recommendations on foods to eat and those to avoid. If the first blood sugar level, or fasting blood sugar level, is too low, the nutritionist may recommend a snack at night that would help prevent the blood sugar level from becoming too low.   

If the pregnant woman’s blood glucose levels remain high, the baby’s blood glucose levels are higher than they should be. The high blood glucose levels of the baby causes the baby’s pancreas to produce extra insulin. The insulin turns the glucose into energy. The energy that is not needed by the baby is turned into fat. Babies whose mothers’ had gestational diabetes tend to be large due to this extra fat.

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Type 2 Diabetes – Prevention And Control

Type 2 diabetes usually begins in adulthood. It is often called noninsulin dependent or adult-onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can often be controlled by following a diabetic diet. Exercise is also helpful in preventing and controlling type 2 diabetes.

The biggest risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes is obesity. Abdominal fat is especially linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight can help prevent and control type 2 diabetes, but it is not a guaranteed method of prevention of the development of diabetes. Advanced age, inactivity, and heredity are additional risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

People of certain races are at greater risk for developing diabetes. American Indians, Hispanics, and those of Asian or African decent are more predisposed for the development of type 2 diabetes. If a woman had gestational diabetes, diabetes during pregnancy, she is at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

Type 2 diabetes is caused by a tolerance to insulin or a decrease in the amount of insulin being produced. Insulin is produced by the pancreas and enters the bloodstream. In the blood, the insulin delivers glucose in the blood to the body’s cells. When insulin is ineffective or there is not enough insulin to infuse the body’s cells with glucose, the glucose remains in the blood. When the amount of glucose in the blood increases, it causes diabetes and the complications associated with diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is called noninsulin dependent diabetes because the body does produce insulin, so insulin injections are usually not necessary. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin, therefore insulin is a crucial element of treatment. However, if the diabetic patient with type 2 diabetes is unable to control their blood sugar levels with diet and exercise, insulin may become part of their treatment.

Type 2 Diabetes – Why And What

Type 2 diabetes is caused by a decrease in the effectiveness or production of insulin. Without insulin, the amount of glucose, or sugar, in the blood increases. The elevated blood sugar level causes diabetes. If left unmanaged, the high blood glucose level can lead to potentially dangerous complications of diabetes.

Excessive thirst and frequent urination are symptoms of diabetes that are often the first warning sign a person experiences. Excessive hunger, weight loss, and fatigue are common symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes can also cause blurred vision. Diabetes may make sores heal more slowly than usual. Frequent infections can also occur.

If someone experiences symptoms of diabetes, they should consult a doctor to be evaluated for the condition. The physician may use a blood sugar test to diagnose diabetes or rule it out if the blood sugar level is normal. A normal fasting blood sugar level is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). A level between 100 and 125 suggests prediabetes. Scoring above 125 on a fasting blood sugar test indicates diabetes. Instead of a fasting blood test, the doctor may use a random blood test. A score above 200 regardless of when the individual ate is indicative of diabetes.

Much like the tests used to diagnose diabetes, the diabetic patient must check the blood sugar level periodically each day. Usually a fasting reading is taken before the person eats breakfast. Then, the person takes another reading after each meal. It is important for the diabetic patient to follow the physician’s instructions for checking and recording blood sugars.

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), and a high level of ketones in the urine can be serious complications. If left untreated, they can cause seizures and loss of consciousness. Diabetes can cause damage to the eyes which can lead to blindness. Diabetes increases an individual’s risk for cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer’s. Damage to the kidneys, nerves, skin, and feet are possible complications of diabetes. If any symptoms of these conditions develop, early intervention is often the key to preventing a serious condition.

Are You Suffering From Diabetes?

According to the American Diabetes Association, in the United States alone there are 23.6 million people, or shockingly, 8% of the population, who have diabetes. That is a very shocking figure. And most of them are diagnosed with diabetes, in the last ten years.

Could it be due to the everchanging diets of the people? Could it be genetic and hereditary? I think all of the above.

Over the years, as people got more affluent, their diets change too. Everyone starts to be more occupied with work, studies and even leisure and they started to save time on their sleeping time and meals, hence lack of exercise and fast foods has become the ideal choice, and the rest is history. No offence to fast foods but we all know that too much fast food will gradually create more health issues. No details to be mentioned.

There is a Chinese saying, “Illness starts from what goes into one’s mouth while trouble starts from what comes out of it.” So it can be true that diabetes can be caused by the horrific diets of many type II diabetes patients.

It could also be passed genetically, there is also research evidence to prove that it may run in families too. So if either of your parents has got type II diabetes, you got to really watch your diet, sugar blood level and keep fit by exercising to help reduce the chance of getting diabetes.

Further read – http://www.tasteofhome.com/Is-diabetes-hereditary–